American revolution essay conclusion

Ken Bohrer

"Happened upon this site while looking up Oriskany battle. This is truly impressive work! I have been a newspaper photographer in Florida for 32 years. In my travels I have shot many Civil War, Seminole War, and Revolutionary era events, (most all are pre-digital age) and your stuff makes me want to toss out my old slide pages and start all over. Great detail shots,timing, and more. A few months back I read that Ben Affleck MAY direct a movie about Bunker Hill. If so, you should apply for the publicity stills job! Who would have a better portfolio than this?"

Tim Shortt

"Associate yourself with Men of good Quality if you Esteem your own Reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad Company."
 

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Accounts of shoeless continental army soldiers leaving bloody footprints in the snow or going hungry in a land of abundance are all too accurate. Take, for example, the experience of Connecticut’s Private Martin. While serving with the Eighth Connecticut Continental Regiment in the autumn of 1776, Martin went for days with little more to eat than a handful of chestnuts and, at one point, a portion of roast sheep’s head, remnants of a meal prepared for those he sarcastically referred to as his “gentleman officers.” Ebenezer Wild, a Massachusetts soldier who served at Valley Forge in the terrible winter of 1777-78, would recall that he subsisted for days on “a leg of nothing.” One of his comrades, Dr. Albigence Waldo, a Continental Army surgeon, later reported that many men survived largely on what were known as fire cakes (flour and water baked over coals). One soldier, Waldo wrote, complained that his “glutted Gutts are turned to Pasteboard.” The Army’s supply system, imperfect at best, at times broke down altogether; the result was misery and want.

These pages contain collections of American Revolution quotations from revolutionary leaders, contemporary figures and prominent historians. These quotations have been gathered and compiled by Alpha History authors. We are adding new quotations to these pages in October-December 2015. If you would like to contribute a useful or interesting quotation, please contact Alpha History .

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

These pages contain collections of American Revolution quotations from revolutionary leaders, contemporary figures and prominent historians. These quotations have been gathered and compiled by Alpha History authors. We are adding new quotations to these pages in October-December 2015. If you would like to contribute a useful or interesting quotation, please contact Alpha History .

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

Accounts of shoeless continental army soldiers leaving bloody footprints in the snow or going hungry in a land of abundance are all too accurate. Take, for example, the experience of Connecticut’s Private Martin. While serving with the Eighth Connecticut Continental Regiment in the autumn of 1776, Martin went for days with little more to eat than a handful of chestnuts and, at one point, a portion of roast sheep’s head, remnants of a meal prepared for those he sarcastically referred to as his “gentleman officers.” Ebenezer Wild, a Massachusetts soldier who served at Valley Forge in the terrible winter of 1777-78, would recall that he subsisted for days on “a leg of nothing.” One of his comrades, Dr. Albigence Waldo, a Continental Army surgeon, later reported that many men survived largely on what were known as fire cakes (flour and water baked over coals). One soldier, Waldo wrote, complained that his “glutted Gutts are turned to Pasteboard.” The Army’s supply system, imperfect at best, at times broke down altogether; the result was misery and want.

Action Action

american revolution essay conclusion
American revolution essay conclusion

These pages contain collections of American Revolution quotations from revolutionary leaders, contemporary figures and prominent historians. These quotations have been gathered and compiled by Alpha History authors. We are adding new quotations to these pages in October-December 2015. If you would like to contribute a useful or interesting quotation, please contact Alpha History .

Action Action

American revolution essay conclusion

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

Accounts of shoeless continental army soldiers leaving bloody footprints in the snow or going hungry in a land of abundance are all too accurate. Take, for example, the experience of Connecticut’s Private Martin. While serving with the Eighth Connecticut Continental Regiment in the autumn of 1776, Martin went for days with little more to eat than a handful of chestnuts and, at one point, a portion of roast sheep’s head, remnants of a meal prepared for those he sarcastically referred to as his “gentleman officers.” Ebenezer Wild, a Massachusetts soldier who served at Valley Forge in the terrible winter of 1777-78, would recall that he subsisted for days on “a leg of nothing.” One of his comrades, Dr. Albigence Waldo, a Continental Army surgeon, later reported that many men survived largely on what were known as fire cakes (flour and water baked over coals). One soldier, Waldo wrote, complained that his “glutted Gutts are turned to Pasteboard.” The Army’s supply system, imperfect at best, at times broke down altogether; the result was misery and want.

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american revolution essay conclusion

American revolution essay conclusion

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